29 September 2020 playlist

Faeland End of the day single (2020 Pindrop Records)

www.faeland.co.uk 

Bill Callahan Pigeons from Gold Record (2020 Drag City)

www.billcallahan.bandcamp.com

Eli Winter Maroon from Unbecoming (2020 Americans Dreams Records)

www.eliwinter.com

Kris Drever Hunker down/ That old blitz spirit from Where the world is thin (2020 Reveal Records)

www.krisdrever.com 

Chalk Horse Music Hegemony single (2020 Chalk Horse Music)

www.chalkhorsemusic.com

The Rheingans Sisters The yellow of the flowers from Receiver (2020 Bendigedig)

http://www.rheinganssisters.co.uk

Felix Hatfield Lucky to be a sad man from False God (2020 Fangbite Records)

www.felixhatfield.com 

Jenny Sturgeon Air and light from The Living Mountain (2020 Hudson Records)

www.jennysturgeonmusic.com

Salt House Mountain of gold from Huam (2020 Hudson Records)

www.salthousemusic.com

Tom Houston I am the river #33 from Gap in the fence (2020 IPP)

www.tomhouston.org 

Matt Hill Stone and bone from Savage Pilgrims (2020 Quiet Loner Records)

www.matthillsongwriter.com 

The Little Unsaid Half alive digital download single (2020 Reveal Records)

www.thelittleunsaid.com 

Mean Mary Big Tour Bus from Alone (2020 Woodrock Records)

www.meanmary.com

Annie Dressner Midnight Bus from Coffee at the corner bar (2020 Annie Dressner)

www.anniedressner.com

Adam Beattie Somewhere round the bend from Somewhere round the bend (2020 Adam Beattie)

www.adambeattie.com 

Paul Mosley and the Red Meat Orchestra Diamond in the rough from Puppet Songs (2020 Red Crow Records)

www.paulmosley.com

Josienne Clarke Empty hands (alternative studio demo) from Historical Record Vol 3 & 4 Learning to sail (2020 Corduroy Punk)

www.josienneclarke.com

James Edwyn and the Borrowed Band Any other day (acoustic demo) from Before we go EP (2020 James Edwyn and the Borrowed Band)

www.jamesedwynandtheborrowedband.bandcamp.com 

O’Hooley and Tidow Woman in space from Live at St Georges (2020 No Masters Co-operative)

www.ohooleyandtidow.com

Evangeline Gentle The strongest people have tender hearts from Evangeline Gentle (2020 Sonic Unyon)

www.evangelinegentlemusic.com

Kenneth J Nash She’s the one from For Sarah (2020 Old Hotel Records)

www.kennethjnash.com

Our Man in the Field Swansong (don’t play with matches) from The company of strangers (2020 Rootsy Music/Rocksnob)

www.ourmaninthefieldmusic.com 

Emma Swift Going going gone from Blonde on the tracks (2020 Tiny Ghost Records)

www.emmaswift.com 

15 September 2020 playlist

Steven Adams and the French Drops Soft landings from Keep It Light (2020 Fika Records)

www.fikarecordings.com 

Roxanne de Bastion I should live in salt digital download single (2020 Roxanne de Bastion)

www.roxannedebastion.com

Molly Tuttle Fake empire from ..but I’d rather be with you (2020 Compass Records)

www.mollytuttlemusic.com

The National Heavenfaced from Trouble will find me (2013 4AD Records)

www.americanmary.com 

Jerry Joseph Dead confederate from The Beautiful Madness (2020 Decor Records)

www.jerryjoseph.com

 Emily Barker Machine from A dark murmuration of words (2020 Everyone Sang/Thirty Tigers)

www.emilybarker.com

Austin Lucas Already dead digital download single (2020 Cornelius Chapel Records)

www.austinlucas.com 

Josienne Clarke Intro from Historical Record Vol 3 & 4: Learning to sail (2020 Corduroy Punk)

Josienne Clarke Learning to sail in all weather (alternative studio demo elec) from Historical Record Vol 3 & 4: Learning to sail (2020 Corduroy Punk)

www.josienneclarke.com

I’m Kingfisher Children’s atom bomb from The past has begun (2020 Fading Trails Recordings)

www.imkingfisher.com

Ida Wenoe One step digital download single (2020 Integrity Records) 

www.idawenoe.com 

The Magpie Arc Whenever I’m done from EP 1 (2020 Collective/Perspective)

www.themagpiearc.com 

Tom Moore and Archie Moss Gusts from Spectres (2020 Slow worm Records)

www.tommoorearchiemoss.com 

Bright Eyes Mariana Trench from Down in the weeds where the world once was (2020 Dead Oceans)

www.thisisbrighteyes.com 

Snowgoose The optimist from The making of you (2020 Glass Modern Records)

www.snowgoose.me.com

David Ian Roberts Took my time from From the harbour (2020 Cambrian Records)

www.davidianroberts.com

Paul Armfield You from Domestic (2020 PSA Records)

www.paularmfield.com 

Charlie Dore A hundred miles of nothing from Like Animals (2020 Black Ink Music)

www.charliedore.com

The Lowest Pair Enemy of ease from The Perfect Plan (2020 Thirty Tigers)

www.thelowestpair.com

H.C McEntire Hands for the harvest from Eno Axis (2020 Merge Records)

www.hcmcentire.com 

Boo Hewerdine Wanderlust digital download single (2020 Reveal Records)

www.boohewerdine.net

Robb Johnson and the Irregulars 422 from Pandemic Songs (2020 Irregular Records)

www.robbjohnson.co.uk

Kris Drever More than you know digital download single (2020 Reveal Records)

www.krisdrever.com 

The Marriage For worse or for better from Imagining Sunsets (2020 Self released)

www.wethemarriage.com 

Our Man In The Field I’ll be gone from The company of strangers (2020 Rootsy Music/Rocksnob)

www.ourmaninthefieldmusic.com 

1 September 2020 playlist

Gillian Welch and David Rawlings Hello in there from All the good times are past and gone (2020 Acony Records)

www.gillianwelch.com 

Mary Chapin Carpenter American stooge from The dirt and the stars (2020 Lambent Light Records)

www.marychapincarpenter.com

Evangeline Gentle Ordinary people from Evangeline Gentle (2020 Sonic Unyon)

www.evangelinegentlemusic.com

Darren Black with Stewart Prosser & Robert Sword Less in common than we’d like from Playing with the truth (2020 Darren Black)

www.darrenblack.net 

Paul Mosley and the Red Meat Orchestra Cool kids from Songs for Puppets (2020 Crow Collective Records)

www.paulmosley.com

The Little Unsaid Dolly single (2020 Reveal Records)

www.thelittleunsaid.com

Fay Hield Call the storm from Wrackline (2020 Topic Records)

www.fayhield.com 

Hannah White and the Nordic Connections Man without men from Hannah White and the Nordic Connections (2020 Paper Blue Records)

www.hannahwhitemusic.com

Dan Whitehouse Dreamland from Dreamland Tomorrow (2020 Reveal Records)

www.dan-whitehouse.com

Steven Adams and the French Drops Oh Dear from Keep it light (2020 Fika Records)

www.fikarecordings.com

David Grubb The space in between from Nano (2020 Shake ‘em Dud Records)

www.davidgrubb.co.uk 

Kathleen Edwards Simple math from Total Freedom (2020 Dualtone Records)

www.kathleenedwards.com 

Kris Drever Where the world is thin single (2020 Reveal Records)

www.krisdrever.com

Our Man in the field Thin (I used to be bulletproof) single (2020 Rocksnob)

www.ourmaninthefieldmusic.com

Me for Queen Bloodlines (featuring Alva Leigh) from Perfect Stranger EP (2020 Me for Queen)

www.meforqueen.com 

The Magpie Arc Cannon from EP 1 (2020 Collective/Perspective)

www.themagpiearc.com

Molly Tuttle Mirrored Heart from I’d rather be with you (2020 Compass Records)

www.mollytuttlemusic.com

Joshua Burnell Labels from Flowers where the horses sleep (2020 Joshua Burnell)

www.joshuaburnell.co.uk 

Laura Cortese and the Dance Cards Corduroy jacket from Bitterbetter (2020 Compass Records)

www.thisislauracortese.com

Karen Jonas Pink leather boots from The southern sky and other dreams (2020 Karen Jonas)

www.karenjonasmusic.com 

Bonny Light Horseman The Roving from Bonny Light Horseman (2020 37d03d)

http://www.bonnylighthorseman.com

Phoebe Bridgers I know the end from Punisher (2020 Dead Oceans)

Ma Polaine’s Great Decline End of the road from City of Love (2020 OMH Records)

www.mapolainesgreatdecline.com 

18 August 2020 playlist

Glen Hansard Good life of song from This wild willing (2019 Anti Records)

www.glenhansard.com

Arborist/Malojian Good things follow you single (2020 Rollercoaster Records)

www.malojian.com 

www.arboristmusic.com 

Lyn Miles Saddest song I ever wrote from We’ll look for the stars (2020 Continental Song City) 

www.lynnmilesmusic.ca

Eamonn O’Leary Sister in song single (2020 Reveal Records)

www.eamonoleary.net

Kristen Grainger and True North Tattooed love song from Ghost Tattoo (2020 Kristen Grainger and the True North)

www.truenorthband.com 

Ian Roland and the Subtown Set Songbirds from Double Rainbow (Ian Roland the Subtown Set)

www.ianroland.com

Laura Cortese and the Dance Cards Typhoon from Bitterbetter (2020 Compass Records)

www.thisislauracortese.com 

Emma Swift I contain multitudes from Blonde on the tracks (2020 Tiny Ghost Records)

www.emmaswift.com

Darren Black with Stewart Prosser and Robert Sword The Clown from Playing with the truth (2020 Darren Black)

www.darrenblack.net

Charlie Dore Collateral from Like Animals (2020 Black Ink Music)

www.charliedore.com 

Jeremy Tuplin The Inuit from Violet Waves (2020 Trapped Animal Records)

www.jeremytuplin.com 

The Magpies Run river run from Tidings (2020 The Magpies)

www.themagpiesmusic.com 

David Berkeley When the world sits still from Oh Quiet World (2020 Straw Man)

www.davidberkeley.com

Mary Chapin Carpenter Between the dirt and the stars from The dirt and stars (2020 Lambent Light Records)

www.marychapincarpenter.com 

Emily Barker The woman who planted trees single (2020 Thirty Tigers)

www.emilybarker.com

Jeffrey Martin Grower of trees from Jeffrey Martin on Audiotree Live EP (2018 Audiotree)

www.jeffreymartinmusic.com

Stick in the Wheel A tree must stand in the earth from Hold Fast (2020 From Here Records)

www.stickinthewheel.com

Steven Adams & the French Drops My brother the racist single (2020 Fika Records)

http://www.fikarecordings.bandcamp.com

The Jellymans Daughter Wake up call from Wake Up Call EP (2020 Boat Duck Records)

www.thejellymansdaughter.com

Kris Delmhorst Horses in the sky from Long day in the milky way (2020 Big Bean Music)

www.krisdelmhorst.com

Courtney Marie Andrews How you get hurt from Old Flowers (2020 Loose Music)

www.courtneymarieandrews.com

Laura Marling Strange girl from Song for our daughter (2020 Chrysalis Records)

www.lauramarling.com 

Oh Susanna Sleepy little sailor (acoustic version) from Sleepy Little Sailor (2001/2020 Stella Records)

www.ohsusanna.com 

The Revolution resumes..

After a break I’ll be back on air live from the studio with the Quiet Revolution on Tuesday 18 August. Lots of new music to share with you. I really hope you’ll be able to join me between 9 and 11pm.

The Quiet Revolution albums of the year so far

2020 has certainly been a difficult and unusual year. I presented my last live Quiet Revolution on 3 March at which point only a relatively small number of new albums had been released. There followed a break in shows when lockdown began and I resumed on the air late April with a recorded show that looks likely to continue for, well, I’m not sure how long to be honest!

This ability to continue the show albeit in rather a different way has I’m delighted to say enabled me to shine some light on some of the excellent new records that have been released in 2020. In some ways because of the much more home-based way we’re living the fact that we’re six months into the year seemed to creep up on me more than ever!

In the last few years, I’ve tended towards posting my favourite releases of the year this way. Mid-year and then again in December. It seems to work for me and is an easier way of keeping track of everything I’ve enjoyed and not missing anything.

Hope you enjoy discovering some of these fine artists and records if you haven’t been lucky enough to have stumbled across them before now I hope you enjoy discovering them from here on in. And do let me know what you think, you can post comments on this blog or on Twitter.

I also really like what I’ve heard of Tom Houston’s Gap in the fence which hasn’t been released yet although some singles from the album have. I envisage Tom’s album will appear in my next blog about my favourite releases in December. In the meantime check him out at http://www.tomhouston.org

What shaped the revolution

This blog post covers the development of my musical taste. If none of what I talk about in this piece had happened I certainly wouldn’t enjoy the wide range of music that I do and neither would there be a radio show called the Quiet Revolution. Whilst the latter began effectively in 2007 when HFM Radio was awarded a permanent community radio licence, there was a considerable musical journey of discovery for me preceding this. In response to my post on Twitter suggesting putting together a show playing some of the key influences in my musical education musician Dan Whitehouse said with some accuracy, it would be the story of “how the revolution started”. Devon duo Harbottle and Jonas spoke in terms of it being an exploration of “what shaped the revolution”. Thanks to everyone who offered words of encouragement. This blog is intended to sit alongside the Quiet Revolution show from 16 June.

If I were to identify the four key things that most influenced my musical taste they would be radio, the singer songwriter Al Stewart, the Cambridge Folk Festival and an ongoing curiosity to discover the new.

Radio played a big part as I will explain. It’s entirely reasonable to say that what follows is about both my discovery and love for radio and music. The two went together for me. My initial radio listening through school days was the BBC’s national pop channel Radio 1. This was the much maligned Smashey and Nicey era where the daytime playlist was dominated by top 40 chart hits and golden oldies. Very firmly in the mainstream with only John Peel as the late-night champion of more adventurous music. I confess that he wasn’t an influence for me in terms of what he played yet what did appeal was his clear love of music an interest in unearthing the new.

So national radio at this point didn’t have a great deal to offer me. However, as we moved into the mid-1980’s and my interest in music was developing further I started to consume lots of independent local radio (ILR) starting with my local station (Hereward Radio, in case you were wondering). If I was anywhere else, on a car journey or on holiday in another part of the country I’d tune in to different stations to hear what they had to offer. I would probably be described as a geek in today’s terms. That’s okay, I’m comfortable with that.

Chart music and oldies dominated much of ILR output although there was a greater opportunity for presenters to influence what they played on their shows during this period. This is what I honed in on. I started listening to a presenter on my local station who I found had good taste in music and dared to be a little different. One evening on his show he played Crosby Stills and Nash. I’d never heard them before but was immediately drawn to Southern Cross and Wasted on the way from the band’s 1982 Daylight Again album. Such was the impact of the latter it remains to this day my all-time favourite song. Another thing I loved about CSN were those glorious vocal harmonies.

The same presenter starting featuring tracks from Joni Mitchell’s Thomas Dolby-produced Dog Eat Dog album. This was 1985, and I was hooked. It’s worth adding that CSN’s Daylight Again and Joni’s Dog Eat Dog haven’t ever really been viewed favourably by music critics yet they are stand out releases for me. I bought both albums and then began to explore their back catalogues. I also discovered Jackson Browne through the same radio show with my point of entry being his Lawyers in Love album, especially the song Tender is the night and the title track. Again there was much more to discover in Browne’s earlier albums too. It seemed I’d a great deal of catching up to do.

Having been introduced to Joni and Jackson, I was starting to develop the beginnings of a passion for singer-songwriters. This led me to Bob Dylan. Of course I’d heard his more well-known songs from the 60’s on the radio but that was as far as I’d got . So I started to explore further afield with Blood on the tracks the first album I bought. Lyrically it was astonishing. I remember wondering why I’d not started to investigate his music earlier. Blood on the tracks is still my favourite of Dylan’s albums. I then went on to discover his Desire album and realised that someone called Emmylou Harris sang backing vocals on the album. That was possibly the start of my dipping a toe into the worlds of country and alt-country and initiated my long-standing appreciation of Emmylou’s work. From Desire I moved onto Street Legal. Another inspiring album for me and, a little like Slow Train Coming, which I also like, one that tends not to garner plaudits from the music press. I’d go further and say I found myself enjoying Dylan’s albums from the 70’s more than any other period of his career. Sure they’re not all gems but there’s much to enjoy.

It was also becoming clear I found story songs incredibly compelling and whilst being familiar with Simon and Garfunkel’s songs there was a gap in my knowledge of Paul Simon’s solo releases. I felt I needed to put that right so I worked my way through his albums and found songs like Train in the distance, Rene and Georgette Magritte and their dog after the war and the Late great Johnny Ace drew me in every time. From there it was on to Randy Newman. I think I heard one of his most unrepresentative songs first, I love LA and picked up a copy of his best of album which had that song on it and many more. I became a fan from there. Randy Newman didn’t shy away from making social comment in his songs, often with a touch of humour, a quality I realised appealed to me in a songwriter. This was to be something I subsequently came to appreciate through folk music which often explores the experiences of ordinary working people from a traditional or more contemporary perspective. Sometimes, of course, traditional songs written for a particular time resonate and become relevant again even though written in an earlier age. I suspect when I later went on to find Loudon Wainwright III’s music what drew me in at the start was his willingness to tackle social and political issues in his songwriting. He also wrote in a confessional way about his own experiences and could be barbed, funny and heartbreaking too, sometimes in the course of the same song. I found him very much up my musical street and quickly realised there was far more to him than the ‘hit’ Dead skunk in the middle of the road!

It was through independent local radio too that I came to hear the music of Al Stewart. I had heard his ‘hit’ Year of the Cat which though a fine song would have been difficult to avoid but I grew more interested in him after hearing songs like Time passages, On the border and Lord Grenville. I really liked his voice and the clever way he was able to weave history into his songwriting. I’d not heard anything quite like it before. He was different. It was almost certainly via Al Stewart that I went on to explore the music of Nick Drake and John Martyn. I suspect he also pushed me in the direction of Richard Thompson.

Beyond the genres of folk or americana I had developed a love of the music of Steely Dan which I seem to remember was through that DJ with good taste on my local radio station again. This underlines the significant part radio can play to introduce you to new music, providing you have a trustworthy guide. I must have heard some of Steely Dan’s more well-known songs such as Reeling in the years and Rikki don’t lose that number yet I think it was via Donald Fagen’s solo record The Nightfly that I found my way back to exploring the band’s back catalogue. Working through all of their records the one that was my favorite then and remains so to this day is the Katy Lied album. The jazzy elements present in Steely Dan’s music were intriguing in that I’ve never really got into jazz or maybe I just didn’t understand it! John Martyn, who I mentioned earlier, certainly had this jazz vibe running through much of his work especially beyond his earlier more folky releases with one of the best examples for me being his sublime song Fine lines. So perhaps I just didn’t enjoy jazz in its natural form!

By this point it was the late-1980’s and moving into the start of the 90’s. Radio 1 had moved on, at least in some respects, and although relatively unchanged in its daytime output they’d adopted a less ‘safe’ approach in some of their evening programmes. I spent late nights and early mornings listening to Bob Harris’s overnight shows followed by bleary eyed days at work. This was before the arrival of listen again or the Sounds app!

I must have gone to my first gig in about 1990 or 1991. I was quite a later starter when I think about it now. I went to see Van Morrison at the Derngate Theatre in Northampton having heard his music again on the radio circa the Avalon Sunset and Enlightenment albums. I remember it being a superb gig musically but coming away rather disappointed with Van’s, er, minimalist approach to audience engagement.

My next gig was at the same venue and it was to see Judie Tzuke. I’d liked her music since hearing songs such as Understanding and For You. Judie was excellent although for me the support artist Phil Burdett stuck in my mind even more. I’d never heard of him before that night as he wandered onto the stage with his guitar and a can of Old Jamaica ginger beer. I liked him already! When he sang his first song and certainly by the time he had got further into his relatively short set I was captivated. There were influences, to my ears anyway, of Van Morrison, blues and country. I was incredibly keen to buy some of his music but this wasn’t possible as he didn’t have a record deal. I waited for a number of years and eventually his debut album, including many of the songs I’d heard at the gig was released. I’ve stayed with him since then and followed his music, and played it regularly on the show through the years.

In about 1992, another national BBC station, Radio 2, was going through the beginnings of a change and introduced a weekly country show called, rather unimaginatively perhaps, New Country. The show proved a surprisingly useful gateway for me to some of the less ‘traditional’ country artists. Sure there was a fair chunk of polished Nashville mainstream music included which really didn’t appeal to me but every so often you would hear something that was edgier, more left-field from, say Mary Chapin-Carpenter or Steve Earle. I think I first heard Gretchen Peters on the same show. So this was a very welcome nudge in the direction of getting a taste for what was possibly then called alt-country. Indeed one of the reasons I still use the term alt-country on one of my show ID jingles and my online blurb about the show is to acknowledge the significance of discovering this genre. On New Country country-rock was occasionally featured and I seem to remember tracks being played from an album called Common Thread where doyens of the new country world explored the back catalogue of The Eagles. This served to remind me, though often derided , I did rather like The Eagles. So I started to re-discover them. And what was becoming the norm for me was I found I usually liked their lesser known songs such as My Man, seemingly about Gram Parsons, rather more than the hits. In fact when I first became involved with HFM Radio as part of their temporary licence broadcasts back in maybe the early 2000’s I did a Tuesday night show which at the time I called country-rock. To be honest a good deal of the playlist was americana (the artist formerly known as alt-country) but I wondered at the time whether that would mean anything to people so went for country-rock instead! I now wish I’d been more bold.

In around 1993 I started going to festivals. Well one festival in particular to be honest, the Cambridge Folk Festival. There were to be many other festivals that I subsequently attended but Cambridge was an annual event for many years. What was especially appealing for me was the broadness of the festivals booking policy with line-ups encompassing americana, blues and world music in addition to folk. So I was able to begin to appreciate contemporary blues from artists such Keb Mo and Eric Bibb and also discover world music which I developed a real and enduring liking for. My tastes were expanding further.

As we moved through the 90’s and into the 00’s through tuning into Bob Harris’s Saturday night show on Radio 2, and coming across the Sounds of the New West americana/alt-country compilations that were issued free with the music magazine Uncut I was at another turning point in my journey. Lots of artists made their mark on me, too many to mention here, yet a real fork in the road was Kathleen Edwards 2002 debut album Failer. It’s been such an important record for me. To this day it’s in all time my top 10 americana/alt-country albums.

It was at Cambridge some years later, probably around 2001, where I stumbled upon Show of Hands. I’d never heard of them before, wasn’t sure I’d even like them. I really shouldn’t have had any worries as Steve Knightley and Phil Beer were a revelation. Amongst other things they offered a bridge for me between contemporary and traditional folk with influences on their music drawn from the worlds of rock, country and blues. I’d had a bit of a blind spot for more traditional folk music before seeing them and they helped me start to get beyond that.

Through Show of Hands I also discovered Martyn Joseph’s music. Steve Knightley, Tom Robinson (who I’d liked since first hearing War Baby in 1983 or ’84) and Martyn had developed a side project called Faith Folk and Anarchy. They sang each other’s songs, recorded two albums (one studio and another live) and did a tour. I went along to see their gig at Stamford Arts Centre. I bought and devoured the albums. And I’d found someone else whose music was a real discovery, Martyn Joseph. He was someone else who wrote songs about ordinary people’s lives and incorporated social comment and elements of protest into his material which appealed to me.

And back to radio for a moment. In 1987 Mark Germino put out an album called Caught in the act of being ourselves. One of the songs from that record was called Rex Bob Lowenstein. The character in the song, and yes it’s another story song, was a radio DJ who was notable in that he played what he wanted to play on his show irrespective of genre. He didn’t adhere to the rigid playlists as his bosses demanded. If I was trying to develop my musical tastes now it would be less likely to be through the radio, or should I say it would probably not be through commercial radio. As patterns of ownership have changed the radio landscape beyond recognition a few large corporations run the majority of radio stations and the playlists are set in stone, sticking firmly to the mainstream, offering nothing new and certainly not rocking the boat. Community local radio stations are thankfully different and, like the one I’ve found a home on, can be more innovative, take a few risks and offer shows like the Quiet Revolution.

Before I conclude you might be asking why the name? What made me call the show the Quiet Revolution? I thought about leaving this a mystery but it’s part of the story. So here goes. The whole idea of the show, the sole reason I do it, is to introduce the artists and bands I like to others. This after all was what I learnt to love about radio, that I was able to hear artists and bands I hadn’t previously encountered and to get that buzz of excitement that comes from finding something new. So I work on the basis that people listening are just like me, they enjoy and are open to discovering new things. So it’s all about the music and not me. To emphasise that I wanted to ensure the programme I put together was not called the Adam Wilson show. I’m there to show case the music, not myself, so it needed to have a name that didn’t simply include my own. If listeners like the way I present things and how I put the programme together, that’s great but my role was always intended to be a secondary one. The music is the attraction.

The show is certainly about going against the grain, doing something different. Offering an alternative. I have total musical freedom. Quite a revolutionary concept in itself in today’s radio landscape. Certainly the majority of the music I play is on the quieter end of the spectrum, hushed, often acoustic but with a lot to say. With that in mind, as I mentioned earlier, many of the songs I play incorporate social comment and reflect the times we’re living through, or those that earlier generations have lived through or reflect our experience of history repeating itself. Some of the tracks I feature are contemporary protest songs. Vive la revolution!

In terms of the style of presentation, I’m quietly spoken. I am possibly the least likely person to shout at you through your radio. I want to allow the music I play to whisper it’s charms to you through my playlists and for you to be suitably intrigued to want to find out more about the artist or albums and buy a record or go to a gig, ideally both!

So the show I’ve developed embraces all of these distinct elements and the name the Quiet Revolution just seemed to bring everything together. The revolution may be quiet, but it continues… Thanks for being part of it.

16 June 2020 What shaped the revolution playlist (part 1)

Gillian Welch Time (The Revelator) from The Revelator (2001 Acony Records)

www.gillianwelch.com 

Eagles My Man from On The Border (1974 Asylum Records)

Jackson Browne Before the deluge from Late for the sky (1974 Elektra/Asylum)

www.jacksonbrowne.com 

Steely Dan Rose darling from Katy Lied (1975 Universal Records)

Boz Scaggs Sail on white moon from Slow Dancer (1974 Sony Records)

www.bozscaggs.com 

Kathleen Edwards Hockey Skates from Failer (2003 Rounder Records)

www.kathleenedwards.com 

Ani Di Franco You Had Time from Out of range (1994 Righteous Babe Records)

www.anidifranco.com 

Show of Hands Are We Alright from Cold Frontier (2001 Hands On Music)

www.showofhands.co.uk 

Joseph, Robinson and Knightley Killing fields from Faith Folk and Anarchy

Martyn Joseph Cardiff Bay from Thunder and rainbows (The best we could find) (2001 Pipe Records)

www.martynjoseph.net 

Oi Va Voi (featuring KT Tunstall) Yesterday’s mistakes from Laughter through tears (2003 Outcaste Records)

www.oi-va-voi.com 

Joni Mitchell Impossible dreamer from Dog Eat Dog (1985 Geffen Records)

www.jonimitchell.com 

Nanci Griffith It’s a hard life wherever you go from Storms (1989 Universal Records)

www.nancigriffith.com 

Iris De Ment Wasteland of the free from The way I should (1996 Yep Roc Records)

www.irisdement.com 

The Indigo Girls Closer to fine from Indigo Girls (1989 Sony Records)

www.indigogirls.com 

10,000 Maniacs Trouble Me from Blind Man’s Zoo (Elektra Records)

Randy Newman Louisiana 1927 from Good old boys (1974 Warner Records)

www.randynewman.com 

Paul Simon The late great Johnny Ace from Hearts and Bones (1983 Sony Records)

www.paulsimon.com 

Crosby Stills and Nash Wasted on the way from Daylight Again (1982 Atlantic Records)

www.crosbystillsandnash.com 

Bob Dylan Tangled up in blue from Blood on the tracks (1974 Sony Records)

www.bobdylan.com 

Peter Bruntnell You won’t find me from Normal for Bridgewater (2001 Rykodisc)

www.peterbruntnell.net 

2 June 2020 playlist

Lucinda Williams Shadows and doubts from Good Souls better angels (2020 Highway 21 Records)

www.lucindawilliams.com 

Bonny Light Horseman Lowlands from Bonny Light Horseman (2020 3730d Records)

www.bonnylighthorseman.com

Josh Ritter and the Milk Carton Kids Gospel of Mary digital download single (2019 Pytheas Recordings)

www.joshritter.com

www.themilkcartonkids.com

Dan Whitehouse What I didn’t see from Dreamland Tomorrow (2020 Reveal Records)

www.dan-whitehouse.com 

M Ward Migration of souls from Immigrant Stories (2020 Anti Records)

www.mwardmusic.com

Eliza Gilkyson Promises to keep from 2020 (2020 Red House Records)

www.elizagilkyson.com

Robert Vincent Conundrum from In this town you’re owned (2020 Thirty Tigers)

www.robertvincentmusic.com 

Ma Polaine’s Great Decline Volcano from City of Love (2020 OMH Records)

www.mapolainesgreatdecline.com

Tom Houston Child on a plane (featuring Me for Queen) from forthcoming album Gap in the fence (2020 Tom Houston)

www.tomhouston.org

Lynn Miles Look for the stars advance track from forthcoming album Look for the stars (2020 Continental Song City)

www.lynnmilesmusic.com

Kathleen Edwards Options open from Total Freedom (2020 Dualtone Music) 

www.kathleenedwards.com 

Tom Williams Little did we know digital download track (2020 Tom Williams)

www.tomwilliamsmusic.net

Arborist By Rote from A Northern View (2020 Arborist)

www.arboristmusic.com

Ben Harper Don’t let me disappear digital download single (2020 Anti Records)

www.benharper.com

The Ballroom Thieves For Hitchens from Unlovely (2020 Nettwerk)

www.theballroomthieves.com

Suzanne Vallie Ocean Cliffe Drive from Love lives where rules die (2020 Night Bloom Records)

www.suzannevallie.com

Jason Isbell and the 400 Unit Overseas from Reunions (2020 Southeastern Records)

www.jasonisbell.com 

Billy Bragg Springhill from Relay (Vol. 1) for Music Venue Trust (2020)

www.relayuk.bandcamp.com

www.billybragg.co.uk

Catherine Feeny Not gonna lie from Relay (Vol. 1) for Music Venue Trust (2020)

www.catherinefeeny.com

Teddy Thompson No idea from Heartbreaker Please (2020 Thirty Tigers)

www.teddythompson.net 

Dean Owens Rise digital download single (2020 Eel Pie Records)

www.deanowens.com 

Alec Bowman Never the end of the world from I used to be sad and then I forgot (2020 Alec Bowman)

http://www.alecbowman.com

Matt Hill Roll me out (in the middle of the night) from Savage Pilgrims (2020 Quiet Loner Records)

www.matthillsongwriter.com 

19 May 2020 playlist

Jacob and Drinkwater Tonight from  Relay Music Vol 1-for Music Venue Trust digital download album (song by Edgelarks)

www.relayuk.bandcamp.com 

www.jacobandrinkwater.com 

Edgelarks To my lordless sons from Relay Music Vol 1-for Music Venue Trust digital download album (song by The Little Unsaid)

www.philliphenryandhannahmartin.co.uk

The Little Unsaid Lucky from  Relay Music Vol 1-for Music Venue Trust digital download album (song by Catherine Feeny)

www.thelittleunsaid.com

Emily Barker Can’t be there today from  Relay Music Vol 1-for Music Venue Trust digital download album (song by Billy Bragg)

www.emilybarker.com

www.relayuk.bandcamp.com

 The Lowest Pair Shot down the sky from The Perfect Plan (2020 The Lowest Pair)

www.thelowestpair.com

Vanessa Peters Packing blankets from Mixtape (2020 Little Sandwich Music)

www.vanessapeters.com

Serious Child I grow old from Time in the trees (2020 Four Left Feet Records)

www.seriouschild.com 

Josienne Clarke Throwing love from Historical Record Vol 1 & 2 (2020 Corduroy Punk)

www.josienneclarke.com

Modern Studies Heavy water from Weight of the sun (2020 Fire Records)

www.modernstudiestheband.com

Jeremy Tuplin Space magic from Violet Waves (2020 Trapped Animal)

www.jeremytuplin.com 

Clem Snide Don’t bring no ladder from Forever just beyond (2020 Ramseur/Thirty Tigers)

www.clemsni.de 

American Aquarium Me+Mine (Lamentations) from Lamentations (2020 New West Records)

www.americanaquarium.com 

My Girl the River Slow mover from Cardinal in the snow (2020 MGTR)

www.supertinyrecords.com 

Salt House The disquiet from Huam (2020 Hudson Records)

www.salthousemusic.com

Dan Whitehouse Weighlifting from Dreamland Tomorrow (2020 Reveal Records)

www.dan-whitehouse.com

Kirsty Merryn The Deep/The Wild/The Torrent from Our Bright Night (2020 Kirsty Merryn)

www.kirstymerryn.com 

Jamie Freeman Black Sun digital download single (2020 Jamie Freeman)

www.jamiefreeman.co.uk

Amy LaVere No Battle Hymn from Painting Blue (2020 Archer Records)

www.amylavere.com

Letitia vansant You can’t put my fire out from Circadian (2020 Letitia VanSant)

www.letitiavansant.com 

Siobhan Miller While the whole world sleeps from All is not forgotten (2020 Songprint Recordings)

www.siobhanmiller.com

Martyn Joseph When we get through this digital download single (2020 Pipe Records)

www.martynjoseph.net

Karine Polwart Machines from Scottish Songbook (2019 Hegri Music)

www.karinepolwart.com 

Dean Owens Strangers Again from The Man from Leith: the best of Dean Owens (2020 Eel Pie Records)

www.deanowens.com 

Alec Bowman Long Goodbyes from I Used To Be Sad & Then I Forgot (2020 Alec Bowman)

www.alecbowman.com 

5 May 2020 playlist

Dan Michaelson Old Kisses from First Light (2017 The State 51 Conspiracy)

Kirsty Merryn Constantine from Our Bright Night (2020 Kirsty Merryn)

www.kirstymerryn.com

The Lowest Pair How far I would go from The Perfect Plan (2020 The Lowest Pair)

www.thelowestpair.com

Alec Bowman Event horizon of you from I Used To Be Sad & Then I Forgot (2020 Alec Bowman)

www.alecbowman.com 

Our Man In The Field It was ever so digital download single (2020 Our Man in the Field)

www.ourmaninthefieldmusic.com

Peter Knights Gigspanner Big Band Awake Awake from Natural Invention (2020 GSCD)

www.gigspanner.com

Lisa Marina More? from Born in tribes (2020 Lisa Marina)

www.lisamarina.com 

Ron Sexsmith Whatever shape your heart is in from Hermitage (2020 Cooking Vinyl Records)

www.ronsexsmith.com

Reg Meuross Shine On digital download single (2020 Hatsongs Records)

www.regmeuross.com

Martyn Joseph Nye from Sweet Liberties (2016 Quercus Records)

www.martynjoseph.net 

Israel Nash Dividing lines from Topaz EP (2020 Desert Folklore Music)

www.israelnash.com 

Peter Oren John Wayne from The Greener Pasture (2020 Western Vinyl)

www.peteroren.com 

Alison Moorer Bad weather from Blood (2020 Thirty Tigers)

www.alisonmoorer.com

Kathleen Edwards Empty Threat from Voyageur (2012 Zoe/Rounder Records)

www.kathleenedwards.com

Vanessa Peters Sister Golden Hair from Mixtape (2020 Little Sandwich Music)

www.vanessapeters.com 

Sam Carter Slow waves from Hard Waters (2020 Captain Records)

www.samcartermusic.co.uk 

Ned Roberts Slower than the sea from Dream Sweetheart (2020 Aveline Records)

www.nedroberts.bandcamp.com

Me for Queen Perfect stranger digital download single (2020 Me for Queen)

www.meforqueen.com 

Watkins Family Hour Accidentally like a matryr from Brother Sister (2020 Thirty Tigers)

www.watkinsfamilyhour.com

The Wailin’ Jennies Keep me in your heart from Fifteen (2017 True North Records)

www.thewailinjennies.com

Lucinda Williams Man without a soul from Good Souls Better Angels (2020 Highway 20 Records)

www.lucindawilliams.com 

Gitta de Ridder Like a kite released from To Our Children (2020 Gitta de Ridder)

www.gittaderidder.com 

Rose Cousins The Lullaby (My oldest love) from Bravado (2020 Outside Music)

www.rosecousins.com